Friday, August 29, 2014

Fifty Years Ago This Week in West Rome - 8/31/1964 to 9/6/1964

At long last, a work order was issued for the East Rome US 411/US 27 interchange at the site then known as "Goat Hill." This was the first three-level traffic interchange in Georgia; it was planned so ambitiously because the state was confident that a direct connection from Rome to I-75 was forthcoming in the near future (little did they know that the Rollins family would devote a half-century to blocking that vital link).

State Revenue Agents destroyed another large still in the Texas Valley area, confiscating and then dumping more than 3000 gallons of moonshine. (No wonder that the Snuffy Smith comic strip, with it frequent jokes about "revenooers," was a popular part of the Rome News-Tribune's comic strip page!)

School registration numbers were tallied, and West Rome High School added almost fifty students, pushing enrollment up to 966 students for the 1964-1965 school year.  As a result, 11 teachers were added to the West Rome faculty, including Mrs. Robert Greene (English); Mrs. Elsie Washington (math); Mr. Jack Wiggins (drafting and math); Mr. Robert Greene (science); Ms. Carlee McCarter (typing); Mrs. Janice Vick (English); Mr. Novis Van Johnson (math and history); Mr. Bob Jones (chorus), Mr. Charles Anderson (math); Ms. Sandra Allen (reading) and Mrs. Betty Deadwyler, typing. (This includes 7th grade teachers, who were listed because the 7th grade was housed in the West Rome High School building at this time.)

Senior class officers were elected for the 1964-1965 school year; the new officers include Chris Lawler, president; Ken Payne, vice president; Carole Sewell, secretary; Gerry Law, treasurer, and Judy Wessenger, chaplain.

Mrs. Mann, sponsor of the West Rome yearbook The Watanyah, announced that Judi Burns had been chosen as senior editor and Muriel McAbee would serve as junior editor.

The West Rome Pep Club elected its officers for the school year: Janice Scherer, president; Ken Payne, vice president; Judy Wessenger, secretary; and Lynn Moore, treasurer.

Dalton surprised everyone by pulling off a 25-14 upset win over the Chieftains in West Rome's second football game of the season. Thankfully, this wasn't a region game, so it didn't hurt West Rome's hopes for a region championship.

Piggly Wiggly had chicken breasts for 45¢ a pound; Wellesley Farms ice cream for 49¢ a half-gallon; and turnip greens for a dime a pound. Kroger had Toppy brand bacon for 39¢ a pound, cantaloupes for 26¢ each, and hen turkeys for 49¢ a pound. Big Apple had chuck roast for 37¢ a pound, large cans of pork and beans for a quarter, and a 32-ounce jar of peanut butter for 69¢. A&P had ground beef for 37¢ a pound, tomatoes for 15¢ a pound, and 20 ounces of Surf detergent for 28¢. Couch's had sliced bologna for 39¢ a pound, a 14-ounce bottle of Hunt's catsup for 15¢, and lemons for 4¢ each.

The cinematic week began with The Night of the Iguana at the DeSoto, The Killers at the First Avenue, and All the Way Home at the West Rome Drive-In. The mid-week change up brought Marnie to the DeSoto, Ride the Wild Surf to First Avenue, and Tom Jones (the movie, not the singer) to the West Rome Drive-In.

The Animals held on to the number one slot with "The House of The Rising Sun." Other top ten hits included "Where Did Our Love Go?" by the Supremes (#2); "Because" by the Dave Clark Five (#3); "Everybody Loves Somebody" by Dean Martin (#4); "Bread and Butter" by the Newbeats (#5); "C'Mon and Swim" by Bobby Freeman (#6); "GTO" by Ronny & The Daytonas (#7); "A Hard Day's Night" by the Beatles (#8); "Remember (Walking in the Sand)" by the Shangri-Las (#9); and "Pretty Woman" by Roy Orbison (#10). The number one album this week in 1964? Dean Martin's Everybody Loves Somebody, which was also the best-selling album of Martin's career.

Fifty Years Ago This Week in West Rome - 8/24/1964 to 8/30/1964

Summer came to an end this week in 1964 as school registration took place on Wednesday, August 26th, with students returning to school on Thursday, August 27th.

Coach Kennedy told the Rome News-Tribune that he was "anxiously awaiting to see what this year's football team can do against the competition" after a week of intensive training at Berry College. The season began on Saturday night at Barron Stadium with the Chieftains facing off against the Coosa Eagles; West Rome won the game 14-0, with Dickie Sapp being selected as the Rome News-Tribune's lineman of the week for a 73-yard run that set up the first West Rome touchdown, followed later in the game by a 3-yard sweep to score the second touchdown.

Rome's McDonald's, less than a year old, experienced its first armed robbery on August 24th, 1964, when a gunman entered the store after closing, held up the staff at gunpoint, and made off with $875 in cash. By the end of the week, a Rome man and a Marietta man were arrested for the holdup.

The Rome/Floyd County economy continued to generate more good news: area banks reported that area economic activity increased by 7% over the same months in 1963, showing that both businesses and people were spending more money... and that they had more money to spend!

With Georgia law requiring that all cars pass a safety inspection before new tags could be issued beginning in 1965, Rome entrepreneurs were actively setting up inspection stations, with almost four dozen sites in Rome begin licensed to perform the inspections. All inspections had be performed between January 1st and March 31st, 1965; there was a maximum $5 fee per vehicle for the inspection.

Piggly Wiggly had Maxwell House Instant Coffee for $1.19 a jar (the 1960s and the 1970s were a boom period for instant coffee sales), shank portion ham for 35¢ a pound, and Coca-Cola or Tab for 99¢ plus deposit for a 24-bottle case. Kroger had pork chops for 69¢ a pound, bananas for a dime a pound, and Kroger's ice milk for 29¢ a half-gallon. A&P had sirloin steak for 89¢ a pound, Campbell's tomato soup for a dime a can, and ten pounds of potatoes for 49¢. Big Apple had snapper filets for 59¢ a pound, Big Apple bread for 19¢ a loaf, and Banquet frozen cream pies for 27¢ each. Couch's had baking hens for 29¢ each, five pounds of Dixie Crystals sugar for 39¢, and yellow corn for 6¢ an ear.

In the first half of the week, moviegoers could choose from What a Way to Go at the DeSoto, 633 Squadron at the First Avenue, and Who's Minding the Store? at the West Rome Drive-In. The last half of the week brought The Night of the Iguana to the DeSoto, The Killers to the First Avenue (perhaps the best film adaptation of any Ernest Hemingway novel!), and Who's Been Sleeping In My Bed? (with the unusual pairing of Dean Martin and Elizabeth Montgomery) to the West Rome Drive-In.

The Animals took number one this week in 1964 with "House of the Rising Sun." Other top ten hits included "Where Did Our Love Go?" by the Supremes (#2); "Everybody Loves Somebody" by Dean Martin (#3); "Because" by the Dave Clark Five (#4); "C'Mon and Swim" by Bobby Freeman (#5); "Bread and Butter" by the Newbeats (#6); "Under the Boardwalk" by the Drifters (#7); "A Hard Day's Night" by the Beatles (#8); "How Do You Do It?" by Gerry & the Pacemakers (#9--and a song that the Beatles previously recorded but chose not to release); and "GTO" by Ronny & the Daytonas (#10).

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Fifty Years Ago This Week in West Rome - 8/17/1964 to 8/23/1964

Rome was particularly quiet in mid-August 1964.  School was just a week away, and students were already being bombarded with the usual pre-school advice: start going to bed earlier so you'll be ready for the first day, bring pencils and pens and paper and notebooks to school on the first day to take notes, make sure you know the bus schedule if you're riding the bus, etc.

Rome was still looking for teachers to fill last-minute vacancies; West Rome High School had only one remaining faculty vacancy as of August 19th, and the superintendent was confident that the system would find a qualified teacher by the time classes started.

Rome's economic engine continued to rev up: the Rome-Floyd County Chamber of Commerce reported that almost two dozen businesses were engaged in new construction or major expansion in Rome, including General Electric, the Fairbanks Co., Kay Townes Antenna, Integrated Products, Anderson Manufacturing, Fox Manufacturing, Parrish Bakeries, Rome Frozen Foods, and Rome Casket Company.

And if that won't enough good news, Rome and Floyd County also posted an unemployment rate of only 3.7%, with an annual payroll of $49.6 million, a 12" increase over the year before.

Most of us take the US 411/US 27 interchange for granted—after all, it's been there almost as long as most of us can remember—but in 1964, it wasn't there in its current state, and Rome business leaders and politicians were getting pretty darn frustrated. On August 20th, they voted to request the State Highway Department issue a conditional work order to let Ledbetter Brothers begin site prep while the final details were being negotiated.

Floyd County got its first automatic voting machines this week in 1964, just in time for the upcoming November Presidential elections. The machines were on display at the courthouse so that interested parties could come by and check them out to learn how the newfangled devices actually tabulated your votes.

Piggly Wiggly had Delmonico steaks for 99¢ a pound, white corn for a nickel an ear, and a 24-bottle case of Coke or Tab for 99¢ (and so the price creep began... that's a dime per case higher than they were charging in 1962 and early 1963, the first years I covered in this weekly nostalgic interlude). A&P had Libby's potted meat for a dime a can, half or whole hams for 49¢ a pound, and bananas for a dime a pound. Kroger had cubed steak for 79¢ a pound, Swift's bologna for 29¢ a pound, and a two-pound jar of Blue Plate apple jelly for 29¢. Big Apple had five pounds of Dixie Crystals sugar for 39¢, lamb shoulder roast for 19¢ a pound, and Swift's premium bacon for 49¢ a pound. Couch's had ground beef for 39¢ a pound, pink salmon for 29¢ a can, and a three-pound can of Snowdrift shortening for 59¢.

If you wanted to catch a movie the first half of the week, your choices were McHale's Navy (with Ernest Borgnine, Tim Conway, and the rest of the TV series cast) at the DeSoto, Paris When It Sizzles (with William Holden and Audrey Hepburn) at the First Avenue, and The Running Man (not the Stephen King film, the movie with Laurence Harvey and Lee Remick) at the West Rome Drive-In. The mid-week change up brought Robinson Crusoe on Mars (with Paul Mantee) to the First Avenue, What a Way to Go! to the DeSoto, and Walt Disney's Merlin Jones to the West Rome Drive-In.

The number one song this week in 1964 was "Where Did Our Love Go?" by the Supremes. Other top ten hits included "The House of the Rising Sun" by the Animals (#2); "Everybody Loves Somebody" by Dean Martin (#3); "A Hard Day's Night" by the Beatles (#4); "C'Mon and Swim" by Bobby Freeman (#5); "Under the Boardwalk" by the Drifters (#6); "Because" by the Dave Clark Five (#7); "Walk—Don't Run '64" by the Ventures (#8); "Bread and Butter" by the Newbeats (#9); and "How Do You Do It?" by Gerry & the Pacemakers (#10).

Saturday, August 09, 2014

Fifty Years Ago This Week in West Rome - 8/10/1964 to 8/16/1964

On August 10th, the Rome News-Tribune shared the news that most students were just as happy not knowing: the final two weeks of summer vacation had arrived! School was scheduled to start back on August 27th, beginning the 1964-65 school year that would continue through June 1st. And yes, that meant that back in the mid-1960s, we did get almost three full months off for the summer... and we didn't back to class during what is traditionally the hottest part of the summer.

West Rome High School was allocated $65,000 for the construction of an industrial arts shop, contingent on the the school system receiving the scheduled funding from the Georgia Department of Education. Plans called for the shop to be up and running by the 1965-1966 school year.

Coach Paul Kennedy talked with the Rome News-Tribune about his prospects for the 1964 football season, and he was (as usual) cautious in his comments. "We think we're going to have a pretty good team, but you can never really tell," Coach Kennedy said. "Right now all we're concerned about is Coosa," the team that West Rome was set to play in their season opener on August 29th. "We certainly don't want to go into that game over-confident. We realize that Coosa is going to be a strong club, and against us, we expect them to become super-human." Coach Kennedy had good things to say about quarterbacks Ronnie Kennedy and Ronnie Parker, along with returning players Jerry Coalson, Gordon Walden, Ken Payne, Dickie Sapp, Donnie Hill, and Richard Camp.

Low unemployment and a strong emphasis on education (complete with lower class sizes) left many school systems—including Rome's—with a teacher shortage as the school year began. The state estimated they would have 1,000 unfilled positions at the start of school, while the Rome school system had eight unfilled positions, including one at West Rome. School superintendent M.S. McDonald said that the shortage "won't prevent the opening of any schools, but we may have to double up in some classes."

The start of a news school year meant back to school shopping, and Miller's Department Store cashed in on new clothes shopping with a Seventeen Fashion Show on Wednesday, August 12th, hosted by Pat Sadowsky, editor of Seventeen Magazine. Door prizes included a Magnavox stereo system, a Bulova Caravelle watch, and (of course) clothes from Bobbie Brooks and other manufacturers. More than 300 teenage girls showed up for the event. Meanwhile, Sears announced extended hours, staying open until 9pm for the two weeks leading up to school's start. And everyone got in on the act for the weekend as Rome merchants celebrated "August Dollar Days" on Friday and Saturday with their biggest bargains of the season on clothes, school supplies, and more.

Merchants had every reason to be excited about the sales season: the Federal Reserve released June's department store sales numbers in mid-August, and it showed that Rome sales were up 15% over the same month in 1964, while furniture stores reported a 2% growth. Charge account balances were 12% higher, but Romans were paying off those accounts in an average of 68 days, compared to 77 days in 1963.

After two weeks of extremely hot weather with temperatures reaching the mid and upper 90s, Rome got a break in mid-August when a cool front dropped highs to the low 80s and lows to the mid-50s. Considering how few homes had central air conditioning in 1964, this was undoubtedly appreciated by many of us in West Rome!

Piggly Wiggly had chicken breasts for 39¢ a pound, Plymouth coffee for 69¢ a pound, and ten pounds of potatoes for 49¢. Kroger had chuck roast for 35¢ a pound, bananas for a dime a pound, and (no, I'm not making this up) Cantaloupe a la Mode for 25¢ each—and yes, that was a half a cantaloupe with a big scoop of vanilla ice cream in the center of it!  (I'll wait while you make the appropriate ewww sounds...) Big Apple had baking hens for 29¢ a pound, JFG coffee for 59¢, and Georgia peaches for 19¢ a pound. A&P had cubed steak for 89¢ a pound, canned biscuits for 8¢ a can, and corn for a nickel an ear. Couch's had Oscar Mayer hot dogs for 49¢ a pound, Blue Plate jelly for 33¢ a jar, and fresh okra for 15¢ a pound (and I can almost smell Mom's fried okra...).

The cinematic week began with the Beatles' A Hard Day's Night at the DeSoto, The Carpetbaggers at the First Avenue, and a double feature of Come Blow Your Horn (with Frank Sinatra) and Hud (with Paul Newman) at the West Rome Drive-In. McHale's Navy set sail from television to the big screen at the DeSoto for the last half of the week, while The New Interns (with Dean Jones, Telly Savalas, Barbara Eden, and Stefanie Powers) made its Rome premiere at both the First Avenue and the West Rome Drive-In.

The Supremes took the number one position this week in 1964 with "Where Did Our Love Go?" Other top ten hits included "Everybody Loves Somebody" by Dean Martin (#2); "A Hard Day's Night" by the Beatles (#3); "Under the Boardwalk" by the Drifters (#4); "The House of the Rising Sun" by the Animals (#5); "C'mon and Swim" by Bobby Freeman (#6); "Because" by the Dave Clark Five (#7); "Walk—Don't Run '64" by the Ventures (#8); "Wishin' and Hopin'" by Dusty Springfield (#9); and ""How Do You Do It?" by Gerry & the Pacemakers (#10).

Sunday, August 03, 2014

Fifty Years Ago This Week in West Rome - 8/3/1964 to 8/9/1964

This was a quiet week in West Rome. Summer was coming to an end, and the school year was looming in the not-too-distant future. August began appropriately hot and dry, but to kids enjoying their last weeks of freedom, the was no problem.

The Rome City Board of Education completed its analysis of a potential city-county school system merger, and they concluded that "there would be no purpose to the merger unless the children of both systems were provided with better educational opportunities than are available at present."  Apparently the final decision was that such benefits were not present, since there never was a city or county vote to approve the merger.

Federal government red tape slowed down construction of the East Rome Hwy 411/Hwy 27 interchange. Ledbetter construction spokespeople and district highway engineer WH Jackson were both convinced that the delay would be very brief, and assured Romans that the construction would still be completed on time.

Brazelton-Wallis Printing Company and C&H Transportation both announced expansion plans; the two companies confirmed that they would be relocating just a couple of miles from West Rome High School, on Redmond Court.

Adults who never earned their high school diplomas got a second change as the GED Test was administered in early August at West Rome High School. Testees had to be 20 years of age or older, and they had to supply their own pencils and paper in order to take the test.

The General Forrest Hotel was the site of the Northwest Georgia Coin Show on August 7th and 8th; admission was free, and more than a thousand Romans attended the event.

Piggly Wiggly had lamb shoulder roast for 23¢ a pound, corn for a nickel an ear, and a 20-ounce jar of Maxwell House Instant Coffee for $1.39. Big Apple had chuck roast for 39¢ a pound, bananas for a dime a pound, and Libby's Vienna sausages for 19¢ a can. Kroger had sirloin steak for 79¢ a pound, Duke's mayonnaise for 39¢ a quart, and four rolls of Northern bathroom tissue for 29¢. A&P had 10 pounds of Good Loaf flour for 99¢, pork roast for 29¢  pound, and Sealtest ice milk for 39¢ a half-gallon. Couch's had ground beef for 33¢ a pound, Shopper's Bacon for 49¢ a pound, and Campbell's tomato soup for a mere dime a can (how nice that one of my favorite foods was also so very inexpensive!).

The cinematic week began with Walt Disney's The Moonspinners at the Desoto, The Carpetbaggers at the First Avenue, and The Longest Day at the West Rome Drive-In. The Beatles hit Rome in mid-week as A Hard Day's Night began its run at the DeSoto Theater, The Carpetbaggers hung around for a second week at the First Avenue, and The Sword in the Stone brought Arthurian legendry to the West Rome Drive-In.

Just as A Hard Day's Night finally came to Rome, the film's title song fell out of first place on the Top Ten charts. "Everybody Loves Somebody" by Dean Martin leapt to first place; other top ten hits included "Where Did Our Love Go?" by the Supremes (#2); "A Hard Day's Night" by the Beatles (#3); "Rag Doll" by the Four Seasons (#4); "Under the Boardwalk" by the Drifters (#5); "Wishin' and Hopin'" by Dusty Springfield (#6); "Little Old Lady (From Pasadena)" by Jan & Dean (#7); "C'mon and Swim" by Bobby Freeman (#8); "I Wanna Love Him So Bad" by the Jelly Beans (#9); and "The House of the Rising Sun" by the Animals (#10). However, the Beatles' A Hard Day's Night album did hold onto its number one position for another week.

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Fifty Years Ago This Week in West Rome - 7/27/1964 to 8/2/1964

Seventh District congressman John W. Davis, a Democrat, discussed with Romans the many positive effects of the 1964 tax cuts. "Present indications are that the lightening of the tax burden, along with the general state of good health of the nation, is producing results of a most beneficial nature," Davis said, adding that "federal government spending is running well below earlier official estimates," while "federal tax collections are running well above earlier official projections. Rising business activity has resulted in higher collections from more prosperous taxpayers." Davis went on to reveal that the Treasury's cash balance as of June 30, 1964, was 22% higher than had been anticipated because of the solid economic growth. (If only today's politicians--particularly members of John W. Davis's party--would take a look back to 1964 in their search for a solution to economic torpor and malaise!...)

Meanwhile, Rome banks showed a 23% gain in bank debits (which included checks and other withdrawals from demand deposit accounts); the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta said that growth in bank deposits was considered one of the most reliable indicators of a growth in business activity. (Low unemployment, lower taxes, increased revenues, decreased federal spending, escalating business growth and activity... 1964 continued to shape up as a very good year indeed!)

Chieftains Nelson Payne, Tony Baker, and Derell Brookshire were selected to attend Brevard Music Center's Transylvania Music Camp during the summer of 1964. They were the only Romans who took part in the invitation-only music camp.

Piggly Wiggly had sirloin steak for 89¢ a pound, bananas for a dime a pound, and half-gallons of Borden's sherbet for 39¢ each. Kroger had chicken livers for 49¢ a pound, corn for 7¢ an ear, and a 12-ounce can of Spam for 39¢. Big Apple had ice milk for 39¢ a half-gallon, watermelons for 39¢ each, and whole fryers for 25¢ a pound. A& P had a 24-bottle case of Coca-Cola or Tab for 99¢ plus deposit, canned biscuits for 6¢ a can,and round steak for 79¢ a pound. Couch's had Wilson's pork sausage for 29¢ a pound, sardines for a dime a can, and a ten-pound bag of potatoes for 49¢.

The cinematic week began with The Patsy (with Jerry Lewis) at the DeSoto Theater, Zulu at the First Avenue, and Fun in Acapulco (with Elvis Presley) at the West Rome Drive-In. The mid-week movie changeout brought Walt Disney's The Moonspinners to the DeSoto, The Carpetbaggers (with George Peppard, Bob Cummings, & Alan Ladd) to the First Avenue, and a double feature of Gunfight at the OK Corral and Legend of Sleepy Hollow to the West Rome Drive-In.

The number one song this week in 1964 was "A Hard Day's Night" by the Beatles. Other top ten hits included "Everybody Loves Somebody" by Dean Martin (#2); "Where Did Our Love Go?" by the Supremes (#3); "Little Old Lady (from Pasadena)" by Jan & Dean (#4); "Rag Doll" by the Four Season (#5); "Wishin' and Hopin'" by Dusty Springfield (#6); "Under the Boardwalk" by the Drifters (#7); "Dang Me" by Roger Miller (#8); "I Wanna Love Him So Bad" by the Jelly Beans (#9); and "I Get Around" by the Beach Boys (#10).  The Beatles also held on to the top two album positions with A Hard Days Night at #1 and Something New at #2.

A Little Bit of Sole...

Time to retire another pair of Rockport Pro Walkers...

For the past fourteen years plus, I have walked about five miles a day, sometimes more. It was the first form of exercise I seriously engaged in after my heart surgery back in 2000; I began walking once a day, a couple of miles, but by mid-summer of 2000, I expanded that to twice a day walking. Sometimes I walk a third time late at night, after most everyone has gone to bed, just to enjoy the quiet.

As a result, I wear out a lot of shoes. A pair of Rockports is usually good for about 2000 miles. That means that I wear out a pair about once a year, more or less. My shoes have a great way of informing me that they're ready to be retired: when I step into a minor puddle and my socks get wet because the water is forced through the holes in the shoes, then I know that it's time to move on to the next pair.

I usually keep two or three pair of size 11 Pro Walkers in reserve--some in white, some in white, some in wheat. Color really doesn't matter that much (even though white always looks extremely bright when I first put them on, it dulls somewhat after I put a little wear and tear on the shoes), but comfort does. I've tried other shoes, and the Pro Walkers are right for me--no pain, no blisters, no discomfort. That's all I can ask for in a shoe, I guess.

Each time I retire a pair of shoes, I think of it as a sort of accomplishment: another 2000 miles walked, another year of life enjoyed. When you've died once, you tend to appreciate each extra year, I guess. These worn-out shoes are mundane proof of extra life well-lived, and I am thankful for the chance to wear out another pair.

(And yes, I do wear through the outer edge of each heel more than any other part of the shoe. One site tells me I'm an over-pronator, hitting hard on the outer heel before I roll my foot inward; another tells me I'm a supinator, rolling my foot outward.  I don't know for sure which is correct, since they both indicate this wear pattern as proof of their diagnosis. All I know is this is the way I wear out shoes, and this is the way I've always worn out shoes. I'm not looking to change now, so I refuse to try to modify my gait.)

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Fifty Years Ago This Week in West Rome - 7/20/1964 to 7/26/1964

The series of weeklong summer camps at Glen Holla Boys' Camp came to an end this week in 1964. These weeklong sessions were sponsored by the Rome Boys Club (located in the heart of Chieftain territory); counselors at the camp included Chieftains Jerry Coalson and Ronnie Kennedy. The camp, located off Walker Mountain Road, offered attendees a chance to enjoy a five-day camp experience not too far away from home, under the watchful supervision of camp director Max Bass, four senior counselors, and six junior counselors.

A group of West Rome girls, including Jeanie Maxwell, Jackie Lupo, Patti Tolbert, Donna Mayne, Becky Wood, Yvonne Housch, Nelda Myers, Susan Wade, Jan Nutt, Susan Penn, Barbara Helie, Ann Holbrook, and Gail Rogers, spent their summer volunteering at the hospital and the Floyd County Health Department as a part of the Candy Stripers volunteer program during the summer of '64. The girls worked in pairs for approximately five hours every Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday; some of the girls indicated that their experience in the program had inspired them to pursue post-high-school careers or courses of study in medicine.

Rome's first Soap Box Derby was held on Saturday, July 25th, with more than two dozen entries from Rome and Floyd County. Almost 4000 people were on hand to watch the event.

Seven years after Rome lost its WROM-TV station to Chattanooga, the State Board of Education approved funding to establish a new educational TV station to Rome. Alas, by the time Channel 18 went on the air, it was located not in Rome but in Chatsworth/Dalton instead... Rome just wasn't destined to have a television station, apparently!

By popular demand, The Shrimp Boat brought back its shrimp and fish combo dinner (with hush puppies, tartar sauce, and french fries) for only 97¢. Why 97¢? Because in 1964, sales tax was still 3%, so that made it exactly a dollar with tax.

McDonald's was attracting people to their relatively new Rome location with their 47¢ All-American Meal, which included a hamburger, french fries, and a milkshake. As a special prize, kids received a Golden Arches bank--and if they filled out a birthday club card, they'd get a postcard good for a free All-American Meal on their birthday.

Piggly Wiggly had sirloin steak for 79¢ a pound, canned English peas or green beans for 20¢ each, and whole watermelons for 49¢. Kroger had smoked ham for 35¢ a pound, Kroger bread for 8¢ a loaf, and bananas for a dime a pound. A&P had 7 ounce cans of tuna for a quarter each, round roast for 69¢ a pound, and cantaloupes for 33¢ each. Big Apple had spare ribs for 29¢ a pound, baking potatoes for a dime a pound, and bell peppers for 7¢ each. Couch's had T-bone steak for 69¢ a pound, canned peaches for a quarter a can, and Scott bathroom tissue for a dime a roll.

For the first half of the week, moviegoers had a choice of The Three Lives of Thomasina at the DeSoto, Wild & Wonderful at the First Avenue, and a double feature of Last Train from Gun Hill and Walt Disney's Grand Canyon at the West Rome Drive-In. The midweek switch up brought Zulu to the First Avenue, The Patsy (with Jerry Lewis) to the DeSoto, and Walt Disney's Summer Magic (with Hayley Mills) to the West Rome Drive-In.

The Beatles were back on top as "A Hard Day's Night" took the number one spot on the Top Ten charts. Other top ten songs included "Rag Doll" by the Four Seasons (#2); "The Little Old Lady (from Pasadena)" by Jan & Dean (#3); "Everybody Loves Somebody" by Dean Martin (#4); "Where Did Our Love Go?" by the Supremes (#5); "Wishin' & Hopin'" by Dusty Springfield (#6); "Dang Me" by Roger Miller (#7); "I Get Around" by the Beach Boys (#8); "Memphis" by Johnny Rivers (#9); and "The Girl from Ipanema" by Getz/Gilberto (#10).

The number one album? A Hard Day's Night soundtrack by the Beatles (on the United Artists label) of course! The number two album? Something New by the Beatles (on the Capitol label), which included several A Hard Day's Night songs that weren't on the soundtrack album in the US, along with some odds and ends such as German versions of "I Want to Hold Your Hand" and "She Loves You."

Friday, July 11, 2014

Fifty Years Ago This Week in West Rome - 7/13/1964 to 7/19/1964

Rome and Floyd County continued to show strong economic growth in the summer of 1964, with Rome unemployment coming in at only 4.4% for the summer, almost a full percentage point below the national average of 5.3%. This wasn't as bad as it sounds, though, because students looking for summer jobs routinely registered as unemployed every summer in order to take advantage of the employment office's job listings. Adult unemployment remained steady at about 3.1% in Floyd County... a number we all consider almost unattainable today. And remember, back in 1964 a much higher percentage of the working-age population was participating in the work force, making that figure even more impressive.

Ledbetter Construction Company was chosen to complete the Rome/411 Interchange project, building one of the most ambitious non-interstate interchanges in Georgia  right across the site previously known as "Goat Hill." Rome had ambitious hopes that this interchange would lead to commercial growth on 411 between Rome and Cartersville and on 27 between Rome and Cedartown—and it eventually did, just not as quickly or as thoroughly as civic leaders anticipated back in 1964.

West Rome High School's beloved Mrs. Smiderski was one of 57 social studies teachers in the Southeast—and the only one in Rome—who successfully completed the University of North Caroline Summer Fellowship Program in Economic Education.

And the economic good news continued as Rome's department stores reported 2% sales growth over the first half of 1963.  This was less than the statewide growth average of 9%, but Rome's lower growth was due in part to the fact that it saw higher-than-the-state-average growth between 1962 and 1963 (maybe the rest of the state was just catching up).

This'll have you in stitches: a top-of-the-line Kenmore sewing machine could be had for only $53 at Sears—and that included an all-wood cabinet/sewing console with a folding top that opened out into a spacious work area.

Piggly Wiggly had Delmonico steaks for 99¢ a pound, watermelons for 69¢ each, and Sunset Gold biscuits for a nickel a can. Kroger had ground beef for 29¢ a pound, bananas for a dime a pound,and whole pineapples for 49¢ each—and to make them more attractive to price-conscious shoppers, they also became a Top Value Stamps store effective this week in 1964. Big Apple had chuck roast for 29¢ a pound, a five-pound bag of Domino sugar for 39¢, and fresh okra for 19¢ a pound. A&P had seedless grapes for 29¢ a pound, Porterhouse steak for 89¢ a pound, and Red Rock canned soft drinks for 9¢ each. Couch's had Duke's mayonnaise for 39¢ a jar, sirloin steak for 79¢, and white corn for a nickel an ear.

The DeSoto Theater began the week with special Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday matinee showings of Puss 'n' Boots ("all seats only 50¢"). The week of evening screenings began with Bedtime Story (with Marlon Brando, David Niven, & Shirley Jones) at the DeSoto, Good Neighbor Sam (with Jack Lemmon) at the First Avenue, and a double feature of Lady & the Tramp and Almost Angels at the West Rome Drive-In. The mid-week new movie switch out brought Walt Disney's Thomasina to the DeSoto, Wild and Wonderful (with Tony Curtis) at the First Avenue, and Savage Sam at the West Rome Drive-In.

They're baaaack... After a few weeks out of the Top Ten, the Beatles made their return this week as "A Hard Day's Night" entered the charts in the number two position, right behind "Rag Doll" by the Four Seasons. Other top ten hits included "I Get Around" by the Beach Boys (#3); "Memphis" by Johnny Rivers (#4); "The Girl from Ipanema" by Getz/Gilberto (#5); "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena" by Jan & Dean (#6); "Can't You See That She's Mind" by the Dave Clark Five (#7); "Dang Me" by Roger Miller (#8); "Wishin' & Hopin'" by Dusty Springfield (#9); and "Keep on Pushing" by the Impressions (#10).

The Beatles soundtrack album A Hard Day's Night  also jumped to number three on the charts this week in 1964—and this Beatles album appeared on yet another label, as United Artists had acquired the US rights to the film and its soundtrack. As a result, the  album, featuring a mix of eight Beatles songs and four instrumental tracks arranged by George Martin, would not be available on Capitol Records for another sixteen years, when EMI acquired United Artists and transferred the rights to the soundtrack to Capitol.

Saturday, July 05, 2014

Fifty Years Ago This Week in West Rome - 7/6/1964 to 7/12/1964

Several Rome businesses—including some restaurants, drive-ins, and motion picture theaters—ended their policies of segregation this week in 1964 in keeping with the recently-passed civil rights bill. The DeSoto and the First Avenue were the first formerly-segregated businesses to open the doors to all regardless of race. This marked the long-overdue beginning of the end of segregation in Rome, in Georgia, in the South, and in the nation as a whole. It seems hard to believe that we're only a half-century removed from a time when segregation was still an accepted practice, isn't it?

Rapid residential and business growth in West Rome led to the City Commission "fast-laning" the four-laning of Shorter Avenue at the Underpass. In addition, City Manager Bruce Hamler reported that the City Commission had approved bids for two water storage tanks in the West Rome area to make sure that immediate water needs were met.

Rome Police Chief Nelson Camp announced that, in response to concerns from residents and businesses, the city would actively enforce the 11pm curfew for all residents under the age of 21. Chief Camp said that officers would allow for reasonable extensions for people coming home from work, a movie, etc.

The Rome City and Floyd County school systems continued to discuss a merger of the two systems, with State Board of Education chairman James Peters saying it was the only only path to progress. Today, no one remembers James Peters and the two systems remain un-merged...

We're accustomed to seeing cheaper prices from a half-century ago, but interest rates that banks were paying were certainly much, much higher--more than 16 times today's rates for a standard savings account. Citizens Federal was paying 4.25% interest on all savings accounts this week in 1964... and today, most banks are barely paying the .25% part of that! 

Piggly Wiggly had chicken breasts for 39¢ each, bananas for a dime a pound, and Pillsbury flaky biscuits for a nickel a can. Kroger had ham for 39¢ a pound, cream style corn for a dime a can, and a 24-bottle case of Coca-Cola or Tab for 99¢ plus deposit. Big Apple had chuck roast for 29¢ a pound, watermelons for 33¢ each, and ice cream for 39¢  a half-gallon. A&P had ground beef for 33¢ a pound, potato salad for 29¢ a pound, and smoked sausage for 59¢ a pound. Couch's had sirloin steak for 79¢ a pound, cantaloupes for 29¢ each, and a 16-ounce jar of JFG Peanut Butter for 49¢.

Rome's cinematic week began with The Unsinkable Molly Brown at the DeSoto, How The West Was Won at the First Avenue, and The Dream Maker at the West Rome Drive-In. The mid-week movie switch up brought Good Neighbor Sam (with Jack Lemmon) to both the First Avenue and the West Rome Drive-In and Bedtime Story (with Marlon Brando, David Niven, and Shirley Jones) to the DeSoto.

The number one song this week in 1964 was "Rag Doll" by the Four Seasons. Other top ten hits included "Memphis" by Johnny Rivers (#2); "I Get Around" by the Beach Boys (#3); "Can't You See That She's Mine" by the Dave Clark Five (#4); "The Girl from Ipanema" by Getz/Gilberto (#5); "The Little Old Lady (From Pasadena)" by Jan & Dean (#6); "Don't Let The Sun Catch You Crying" by Gerry & the Pacemakers (#7); "Dang Me" by Roger Miller (#8); "My Boy Lollipop" by Millie Small (#9); and "Keep On Pushing" by the Impressions" (#10).

Comic book readers were happy to see that the Hulk became a regular feature in Marvel Comics' Tales to Astonish beginning with #60, which went on sale this week in 1964. Meanwhile, Captain America and Iron Man were slugging it out on the cover of Tales of Suspense #58, also on sale this week in 1964... and their face-off was the precursor to an ongoing Captain America feature in Tales of Suspense beginning in the next issue.